August 1, 2012 - The August Garden (part 2)


Now we'll venture into the jungle.  I had to chop off some squash and melon vines yesterday, just to give myself a path through the North Garden.

In this corner, the latest planting of Fortex pole beans has begun their ascent up the chain link of the Kennel Garden.  In front of them, not visible, are some celery plants that were planted much later than the first ones.  The earlier ones just grew a bit and went to seed, so I'm hoping a later planting might be more successful.  In front of the celery are the cauliflower that never flowered.  I decided to just leave it, and lo and behold, I think I see a small head forming in one of them!  Even if they do nothing, they're pretty.  They can stay.  To the right of the cauliflower is a pot of oregano.  In the center is a triangle of Gourmet Green French bush beans.  I've begun picking them, but they aren't nearly as productive as the ones I planted in late April.  I guess they don't like this hot weather.  A few carrots remain in the raised bed, along with some pretty little Gonzalez cabbages.  Fortex pole beans are also on the cedar fence to the left.


On the other end of the raised bed are my Red Ace beets, under protection from leaf miners.  I pulled a half dozen sweet baby beets last week.  


Looking back toward the Kennel Garden, you can see how the Waltham Butternut squash vines are taking over.  This is where I had to lop off some vines so I could get from one side of the garden to the other.  They've grown through the corn and were heading down through the East Garden, so I had to take the shovel and head them off at the pass!  To the left are my raspberry bed, a row of sweet peppers, a couple of broccoli plants, Honey Bear acorn squash and the strawberry bed (hiding behind Honey Bear and broccoli).  A few carrots remain in the center.  This is where I had the nematode problem with the earlier carrots, but these, a later planting, seem fine....so far!  The first planting of Honey Select corn is just about finished, but the later Silver Queen is just beginning to form ears.


From this angle you can see the raised bed of raspberries, and the other raised bed of strawberries. More Fortex pole beans grow up the cedar fence.  Cantaloupe vines are everywhere, so between the melon vines, the squash and the flowers, it's real difficult reaching the third raised bed, filled with carrots, that's right in the center of the picture.  Yes, I know you can't see it.  I told you I had a jungle out there!  


Cantaloupe vines cover the ladder and sprawl all over the ground below.  Morning glories grow on the fence and zucchini and yellow squash fill the entire area behind the shed.


Standing back by the raspberries and looking west.


A pot of cilantro is flowering for the bees, and a pot of zinnias adds a bit of color to this end of the garden.  A couple of Happy Yummy Sweet peppers are in the center.


The tomatoes have just gone wild here.  I have them caged, staked, zip tied and roped, and I still have to go out with the shears every once in a while, just to keep a path open for picking.  I don't know where that one is heading up under the eaves.  I'll probably have to get out a ladder and lop it off.


I planted my grow pot with bush cucumbers.  Of course they all sprouted, so now I'll have to bite the bullet and pull out two or three seedlings.


I pulled the storage onions last week, and have them drying on the patio.  It's certainly not the big harvest I got from the Walla Walla Sweets, but better than I thought I'd get.


They sized up better than I expected.


Just look at those broccoli side shoots!  This plant and one other are covered with them.  Wouldn't you know they are from a packet of mixed seed, so I have no idea what variety they are.  I sure would like to know, so I could plant them exclusively in the future!


 These babies are huge.  Some of the largest butternuts I've grown, and the squash patch is absolutely filled with them.  I'd guess at least thirty, maybe more.

Don't forget to look at the fall garden in The August Garden (part 1)!

44 comments:

  1. Criminy-you'll have plenty of butternuts to trade for favors.
    Wow.
    THAT sounded bad.
    I hope you know what I meant.

    All looks so jungle-y and wonderful. Nothing prettier than a healthy, well-tended garden.

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  2. Your garden looks great! Very lush and happy. You really make me want to grow winter squash next year, as yours are doing so good. I'll figure something out for next year.

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    1. Ed, you might say *our* garden looks great, so much of it is from seeds you sent, LOL! Those butternut vines cover an area approximately 40' long by 15' wide, and are smooshing up against and over the fence now. They would grow much longer than 40' if I didn't lop them off occasionally. You'd do better with bush butternut, even though it doesn't produce nearly as many squash. I'm surprised at how large the honey bear has grown, and is still growing larger.

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  3. I wish my butternuts would set some fruit. They always take so long and I worry that they will even produce anything. I love all the flowers you have scattered here and there. I had more last year and this year I miss them.

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    1. Daphne, I think I'm going to be in butternut heaven by September! I
      Every year I seem to add more flowers to the vegetable garden. I'm beginning to love the jungle, with the flowers and the wandering paths (not many straight rows in the North Garden!)

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  4. Living vicariously through your garden, it is simply amazing to see! I want to be you when I grow up! Between maurauding rabbits and our drought, mine is just limping along in Chicagoland. Your efforts have been well rewarded. Thanks for sharing.

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  5. Wow, your butternut squashes are magnificent. Mine are struggling. I think it has been too cold here for them.

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    1. Liz, the Waltham butternuts have always performed well for me. I can plant the seeds right after the last frost, and as soon as we get any warmth at all they really take off.

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  6. Well I've just finished reading both of your August garden posts and man I am impressed! Everything you have looks so lush and healthy! My vine crops are pathetic, they have many dying leaves and pests. Most of all, I can see how hard you work! Everything is so neat and beautiful!

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    1. Thank you, Nutmeg. It's really an easy garden to care for. Other than the occasional attack on overbearing vines, a half hour with hoe and rake every couple of days is all it takes. Picking and preparing the harvest is the hardest part!

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  7. Granny, .......wowwwww and omg and woohoo! I wish we lived closer and you could give us a tour in person. I love the tour in photos though and it sure IS a jungle!
    I'm thinking that tomato is moving into your shed since it's the last open space in your garden. lol. So, how will you store the squash and I love the cantaloupe growing up the ladder. Great use of your ladder and makes it look like you've grown a topiary with birdhouse at the top of the tree. So cute. Are there melons forming on it?
    Your tomatoes make mine look like super slackers! I'm moving to Pasco! Seems hot but good growing conditions!! My summer plantings are sorta slow and paltry by comparison. We've not really had much hot weather so it's been an extended spring garden. Since it's a jungle out there, I can see you in your matching khaki's shirt and pants and matching safari hat and possibly a machete' instead of clippers! LOVE it all!

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    1. AmyT, I wish you lived nearby too. I'd put you and Tera to work, and I'd go read a book or something (you know I wouldn't, don't you). Yes, there are quite a few melons growing. Whether or not they ever ripen is the question. If they do, I'll be tossing cantaloupe at passing cars along with the zucchini! You're more likely to find me in the garden in my jammies, which really bugs Mr. Granny. Hey, it's my back yard, I'll garden naked if I want! No I won't ;-)

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  8. How impressive! All your plants look so healthy and beautiful. Do you use organic spray on them, to prevent insect damage? Would you tell us what your secret is?

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    1. Missis are, I don't use any sprays, other than an occasional dose of fish fertilizer. I tried an organic spray for leaf miners and earwigs this spring, but it was just a waste of money. I have to cover the beets and spinach to protect them, the beans eventually survive with damage to the lower leaves only. I just buy a few yards of inexpensive tulle every spring and cover stuff up if I can.

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  9. This looks like the work of a whole team. It's beautiful, and that you do all of the work (or almost all) is amazing. I love the interspersed flowers.

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    1. Dianefaith, you were right the first time...I do it all. I can't even get anyone to help pick what I grow! Last week it took me two days to drag a bag of compost from the car to the garden, taking a shortcut through the house! Mr. Granny opened the door for me :-(

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  10. Awesome! i just love your beautiful jungle and very jealous of your butternut squash - I only have a handful of fruit on the vine so far.

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    1. Jenny, If you look right in the center of the third picture, you can see a round, light spot. That's the blossom end of a butternut peeking out, and gives you an idea just how large many of them are this year.

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  11. These posts just give me the biggest SHtuff;-) eating grin on my face that you could imagine. What I wouldn't give for my garden to look like this. *sigh* Fantastical. I'd love to come and spend some time helping you out. A lovely garden tour, THANK YOU!!!!

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    1. Barbie, bring it on! I could use the help :-D

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  12. All I can say is WOW! It's a lovely garden.

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  13. The garden area is lush and beautiful! A nice garden scene from just about every angle you can look at it. Productive too!

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    1. Kitsap, the best place to view it from is that bench in the Kennel Garden. I wish you were here, we could have tea in the garden!

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  14. Oh wow - your garden is absolutely gorgeous!!! Thanks for sharing - I could only dream of such a beautiful garden!

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  15. Just WOW!! Everything looks so picture perfect! Do you not have any cabbage worm butterflies where you are? My seedlings would be chewed to the ground in no time if not covered.

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    1. Thank you, TS. I've recently noticed a few butterflies fluttering around, but they seem to be more attracted to the Sweet Williams. I hope they stay there! My big cabbages weren't bothered by them last year, and none of my broccoli had worms, so I hope this year is a repeat of last year's success.

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  16. Granny, your gardens look so serene and peaceful. Just looking at the photos made my body relax. Mine are just burning up this year. I've gotten what I need so I'm just letting them go. The tomatoes are still producing, albeit much more slowly, but I have what I need for the year, so the rest are just for eating.

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    1. Langela, I'm beginning to think I'll not have canning tomatoes this year, only tomato sauce. I planted too darned many cherry and salad sized tomatoes!

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    2. Oxhearts are what you need next year. I've had regular and Lemon varieties and both produced huge fruits in huge amounts.

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    3. Langela, what I need are some determinate varieties that bear all at once, so I can get it over with! I have a few that aren't really close to ripening fruits yet, so maybe they'll sock it to me all at the same time. I hope!

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  17. wow everything is so lush! I think i need to come down and visit for a few days so you can show me how to do a proper garden!!

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    1. Mrs. Pickles, come on down....and bring your hoe and rake! LOL!

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  18. It is really impressive! I so would liekt o walk through it, but, almost feel like I have! Thank you!

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    1. Thank you, David. I love strolling through it, then sitting on the bench and taking it all in. It won't be so pretty in a week or so, when the first corn husks are removed. Maybe I'll let those squash vines fill in the bare spot.

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  19. What is your gardening secret??? Everything is growing like gangbusters in your garden...

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    1. LOL, Anke, no secrets. I just plant and sometimes it grows, sometimes it doesn't. I don't even have a decent compost pile!

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  20. Your garden is absolutely amazing. I'm not nearly as good as filling in open space as efficiently as you do (the spring plants I pulled in June/July still haven't been filled in. I have so much to learn!

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    1. Thank you, Liz. Straight row gardens, like my East Garden, are much easier to navigate, but they aren't nearly as interesting!

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  21. Beautiful, just beautiful! Don't you just love the garden this time of year. It's at it's best right before the dog days of summer. I can already start to see the changes in my garden. The cucumbers are starting to get tired, the zinnias are starting to get mildew and the basil is going to seed.... :-)

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    1. Isn't that the truth, Liisa! I can already see places where the squash leaves are beginning to look yukky underneath, so I just avert my eyes when I pass by ;-) All of my herbs have flowered, so I just leave them for the bees to enjoy. I'll be wanting basil soon, and it is all overgrown and flowering. It's pretty to look at though.

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