May 28, 2012 - Harvest Monday




This week I harvested my largest picking of spinach of the year, and the last of my Chioggia beets.


Harvest for the week of 5/21 through 5/28 

Lettuce - 11.2 oz.
Spinach - 23.8 oz. 
Celery - 3.1 oz. 
Beets - 23.2 oz. (roots only, no greens) 
Tomatoes - 1.8 oz. 

Total for week: 63.1 oz (3.94 lb.) 
Total for year: 294.1 oz (18.38 lb.) 

Daphne's Dandelions is the host for Harvest Monday, where everyone can share links to their harvest for the week. Please visit her blog and leave a link, so we can enjoy your harvest photos!

35 comments:

  1. Your spinach looks yummy! None of mine germinated. :(

    Also, I tried to keep my attention on the veggies... but I love your tile backsplash! Want to come over and work a little Granny magic on my kitchen?!

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    1. LOL, Prairie Cat. If you only knew what I went through trying to find tiles for that backsplash! I didn't end up with what I'd planned on, but love what I did end up with. I'll send my son John over to your place ASAP, I think he did a great job installing them :-)

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  2. It looks yummy. Let the summer onslaught begin!

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    1. Stefaneener, looking out at the garden in the morning sun, I was thinking I don't want to harvest anything from it, because it's all so pretty right now. I just hate to pull up a pretty head of lettuce, or to pull out those lovely cabbages! I almost enjoy looking at it more than I enjoy eating it! Almost.

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  3. " I just hate to pull up a pretty head of lettuce, or to pull out those lovely cabbages! I almost enjoy looking at it more than I enjoy eating it!", where I have seen that thought before, LOL!!!

    Every thing looks great. My spinach is gone, but the tomatoes are now filling that space!

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    1. Ed, like I said yesterday, "great minds" and all that!

      I cooked the fresh spinach last night (it took all of it for four servings), but it will be ready to pick again maybe tomorrow. Expecting temps in the 80s by Thursday, so the end could be near. I might try some of your summer lettuce in its place. I planted some seeds for it yesterday.

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  4. Hi AG
    Jealousy jealousy. Your stuff is looking great.
    I bet that celery wouldn't make it to the house here.
    Hope all is well with you. Grilling out/entertaining today?

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    1. Sue, you should see how much celery I planted....12 plants for two people!

      Nothing planned for today. Of course, I said that on Mother's Day, then everyone showed up that afternoon. At least they brought the food with them!

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  5. Your harvest this week is beautiful and a harbinger of the counter top groaning harvests you bring in all summer! I have been having the same feelings about harvesting this past week. I look at an item and know I should harvest, but the plants are all looking so beautiful right now that I am reluctant to start tearing into it. I will get over it and harvest what we need but it is stopping me from doing anything more than what we need for the dinner table at any particular time.

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    1. Kitsap, that's what I'm doing. Just harvesting what I need when it's needed. Even Mr. Granny is making garden compliments....believe me, that is something! Not only is he complimenting how it looks, but he is finally beginning to appreciate garden lettuce. No more iceberg from the grocery store, except on taco night!

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  6. Beautiful harvest! I love that you're already picking celery and have good spinach harvest!

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    1. Thank you, Jenny. The celery is still rather small, but is losing its bitterness now. With some warm weather ahead, I should see some real growth in the garden.

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  7. Excellent harvests Granny, they look good next to your newly remodeled counter tops too. :)

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    1. Kris, I'm lovin' those new counter tops!

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  8. what a lovely harvest! I love the variety. Rarely do I get tomatoes at the same time I have lettuce!

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    1. Mary, I've had pretty good luck growing lettuce through the summer by growing bolt resistant varieties (Red Sails does well for me) and providing it with a bit of shade. Here is how I did it for a couple of years, and it worked very well:

      http://tinyurl.com/c8np9va

      and

      http://tinyurl.com/72fgxa4

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  9. So pretty. My celery is so small right now. I planted it a bit late this year. I ought to revise my seeding schedule so it gets out earlier. Last year I just grew red celery which is much too strong for fresh eating. This year I have both. Maybe I'll even blanch the regular one.

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    1. Daphne, I need to try blanching some of mine. It's quite small now, so I'm not sure just when I should begin covering it.

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  10. Great harvest! Your beets look divine and your greens are perfect, but those tomatoes...tomatoes! Oh how I long for fresh from the garden tomatoes! Good stuff!

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    1. Thank you, Bee Girl. I've enjoyed the Chioggia beets and will plant them again, but I'm ready for the next crop to mature...red beets! There's just something wrong about beets that aren't red, LOL!

      I picked five little tomatoes today, so it won't be long before I'll be bringing them in by the bowl full.

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  11. Hi Annie, The celery I have started from the ends of a couple stalks I bought don't seem to be growing very fast. Maybe will have to try my hand at some seed next year. My spinach bolted but I sure did enjoy it this year. Learning what greens I like and what I don't! How do you wash your lettuce leaves? Nancy

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    1. Nancy, I cut the roots off and separate the leaves, then wash them in a sink full of cold water. Then I transfer them to the other side of the sink, let the water out, fill the sink again and put the lettuce back in for a second wash (just dunk it up and down in the water. Usually that's enough, but if there is dirt or sand left after the second washing, I do it again. Only when the water ends up looking clean do I dry it well...salad spinner for small amounts, clean pillow case filled with lettuce and taken outside to twirl around and around until no more water comes out. Small amounts are stored in gallon zip lock bags with a folded paper towel in the bottom, larger amounts can be kept in the crisper in the damp pillowcase they were dried in.

      IF I've had a slug problem, I wash every leaf individually under running water! I don't want any extra protein in my salads!

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    2. Annie, Thank you so much for all this information! Nancy

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  12. How big are those beets? I have some chioggias growing but they're looking more long and lean than round from what I can see on the tops. I replanted some as well as some other beet variety so we have big leaves and tiny sprouts in the same bed. lol
    Love that u grow celery. I want to try it next year! All of your greens look great as always. I can't get over the early tomatoes but then it's warmer there. BUT you had tomatoes forever early! I'm starting my tomatoes in January in 2013! lol
    Love the Monday Harvest posts and I agree that the pulling of the veggies is tragic when you've toiled and watched them grow forever. I have some tom thumb heads of lettuce that I am horrified to think of harvesting! BUT is that not what they're for?! omg. I also have the most gorgeous pak choi that has to be harvested any second now and it's hard to even think about it. The only thing that helps is considering what's going in next. Alas I have more lettuces in start form and baby beet seedlings, and a few other items in sucession plantings. So much great stuff, eh? Soon we'll be up to our ears in processing our harvests! I have no clue about how to deal with shelling peas other than SHELL them and bag. Can you freeze them?

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    1. I'd say the largest beet is tennis ball size and the smallest is golf ball size.

      Yes, peas freeze very well. Just blanch them in boiling water for 1 1/2 minutes, then drain and put them in ice water. Let them drain well (I pour them out on a clean dry towel), then (remove from towel and) freeze in a single layer on a cookie sheet. When frozen solid, bag them up and you can take out just what you need and reseal the bag. You can just keep adding frozen peas to that same bag if your harvests are small, like mine.

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  13. look at that celery! beautiful!

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    1. Thanks, Kelli. It's my first time growing it, and so far we're happy with it! It doesn't have a chance to grow to full size, we eat it up too quickly :-)

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  14. It looks wonderful!, just starting to get lettuce and chard now... but it won't be long!

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    1. David, you got a bit of a late start, didn't you? I'm sure you'll soon catch up :-)

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  15. Everything looks beautiful! It just kills me that in one week you harvested the same weight in veggies that I have harvested the ENTIRE month! LOL

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    1. LOL, AnywhereEden! I'm just now catching up with my harvest weight from this time last year. Just wait until the heavy stuff comes in...hopefully lots of squash and potatoes to up the totals!

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  16. Nice! :) What kind of tomatoes are those? They look similar to ours.

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  17. Your celery looks much more appetizing than those pale, limp sticks in the store!

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    1. Loretta, it's much stronger tasting. Not quite bitter, but just on the edge. It's really good in salads and cooking, a bit tough for just eating the stalks. I'm picking it way too young, I know. I haven't the patience to wait for it to mature!

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