June 18, 2012 - Harvest Monday


 Russet Norkota potatoes, the last of the garlic, and a few raspberries.  These potatoes tended to fall apart when boiled, so I think they'll probably be best for baking.


The first shelling peas of the season.  The carrots are going fast, I should have planted many, many more.  


 Here are the peas all shelled, just under 4 ounces.


 Sugar snap peas, the second zucchini of the year, tomatoes and raspberries.


 Celery, carrots. the last of the spring beets and lettuce.


 Walla Walla Sweet onions.  


 Dark Red Norland and Yukon Gold potatoes, peas and zucchini #3.  Already the zucchini are getting ahead of me!  It's time for some zucchini bread.

The next three photos are of the same potato harvest.  I had to have three pounds for a big potato salad for Sunday's family dinner, and I ended up bringing in 4 1/2 pounds!  I've already harvested nearly 15 pounds, and I haven't even started digging yet.  They've all been taken from near the surface, just feeling around with my fingers.  

 Over 4 1/2 pounds.


 Both the Dark Red Norland and Yukon Gold are sizing up nicely.  This red weighed over 7 ounces and the gold over 6 ounces.


 Here they are, all spread out.  The bowl is filled with Minigold tomatoes.


 Sweet peas (edible) and sweet peas (smellable).  I didn't think the sweet peas were ever going to bloom!  The aroma is heavenly, even from this small bouquet.


A few more sugar snap peas, and enough raspberries for breakfast.  

Some of the "flopper" onions were brought in to use for Sunday's dinner.  I didn't get a picture of them, but they did get added to the total for the week.  The rest are hanging in the shed to dry, and won't be weighed until the tops are cut off.


Harvest for the week of 6/11 through 6/17 (in ounces) 

Beets - 6.7 
Carrots - 16.1 
Celery - 4.4 
Garlic - 8.3 
Lettuce - 10.3 
Onions - 43.7 
Peas, shelling - 25.3 
Peas, snap - 15.3 
Potatoes - 153.8 
Radishes - .4 
Raspberries - 15.9 
Squash, summer - 29.8 
Strawberries 2.4 
Tomatoes 8.1 

Total for week: 340.5 oz (21.28 lb.) 
Total for year: 1002.2 oz (62.64 lb.) 

Daphne's Dandelions is the host for Harvest Monday, where everyone can share links to their harvest for the week. Please visit her blog and leave a link, so we can enjoy your harvest photos!


46 comments:

  1. Perfect (!!!) potatoes. They look like pics for a seed catalog!. I always end up with scab--ugly ugly potatoes. WHat's your secret , oh wise (and wonderful) AG?

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    1. Sue, I just stick 'em in the ground and that's what comes out! They are especially nice this year. I did grow a 4 pound Kennebeck potato one year. Dug a ditch and filled it with horse poo (donkey doo would do), then planted the seed potatoes in trenches on either side of it. The trenches were about 8-10" deep, and I covered the potatoes a bit at a time as they grew, until the soil was all level again. Those were the biggest, prettiest potatoes ever!

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  2. Those potatoes look awesome! I've never grown them. Maybe next year.

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    1. Langela, we do love our potatoes, and there is nothing better than freshly dug new potatoes. OK, maybe freshly picked sweet corn is better, but potatoes are a close second.

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  3. My goodness Granny, you are 25 lbs ahead of me! Everything looks great!

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    1. Robin, really? I'm ahead of you? How did that happen?

      LOL, I need to finish my first cuppa coffee before I start typing. You have been robin, Tobin and Robing so far....I finally got it right :-D

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  4. Looks wonderful! I'd love to have your carrots, onions and zucchini as mine are laggin behind. And those raspberries look so good!

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    1. Jenny, I'll be really lagging on the carrots this year, but I did get a lot more planted this week. The raspberries are delicious!

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    1. It is/was yummy, Loretta. We've actually eaten most of it, thanks to a family get together yesterday.

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  6. WOWSA What a harvest. I would expect that because of your expansion, but :-) still it makes me smile. This year I went all out with the carrots. I plan to do the same next year. I've really enjoyed having so many for the kiddos.

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    1. Barbie, believe it or not, it's just about the same (poundage wise) as the past two years. It should really pick up once the winter squash, corn (hopefully) and potatoes all mature. That's where I used the extra space.

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  7. Fantastic harvest, nice variety!

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    1. Thanks, Erin. I'm especially happy with the potatoes this year!

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  8. Looks like another awesome week for you granny. Those potatoes are gorgeous! I have also noticed your celery is always cut. Can you grow it as a cut and come again plant? Sadly, celery is not something we can grow here :(.

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    1. Coral, I cut the outer stalks and it continues to grow from the center. However, it never did get any fat stalks, and now it's bolting to seed. I've found it shouldn't be planted out until after the night temps are consistently above 50F, and mine suffered through many nights in the 30s and 40s. I planted a later crop, so I'm just keeping my fingers crossed it succeeds. This is my first try at growing it, and it's all a learning experience!

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  9. Wow I can't believe you already have potatoes!

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    1. Vanessa, yes I do...and they sure are good!

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  10. Looks fantastic. I'm still agog at you keeping up with so much. I'm overwhelmed even with my smaller harvests.

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    1. Stefaneener, I do have my bad days.

      Really though, you must remember I just have the two of us to take care of, and Mr. Granny has almost learned how to take care of himself...he's only been in training for 50 years now, so I'll give him a couple more to perfect it. I really have nothing else to do with my days, other than cook, clean and garden. Although I must admit I managed quite well when I had five children at home! I'm just one of those people who can't sit still.

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  11. Wow! That's a fantastic harvest for one week! What type of garlic is that, Granny? It looks a lot like mine, red-skinned and kind of small, but I have no idea what variety mine is.

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    1. Anywhere, it was just store bought garlic, and it was white skinned when I planted it! I'm not much of a garlic connoisseur, and more likely to pick up a shaker of garlic powder than to press a fresh clove. However, there is nothing better than squishing some roasted garlic onto a piece of crusty French bread. These were awfully small, but they had to be moved this spring when I relocated a section of the garden, and they never did recover from transplanting. Next year they will get their rightful spot in the garden, and I'll hope for 4 ounce heads like I had last year.

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  12. I am awed at you harvest! I can't even begin to think when I'll have carrots, beets and potatoes and my summer squash is just beginning to blossom. But your photos are making me anticipate good things to come!

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    1. Awww, Nutmeg, before long you'll be wondering what on earth to do with all the garden goodies you're bringing in! Good things are coming :-)

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  13. Lookin' good as usual! I just love your harvests--wish I was at 100lbs already!

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    1. Thanks. Dorothy! My harvest isn't quite at 100 pounds yet, but I'm over half way there!

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  14. wow wow wow! Great harvest as always I just love your pictures!

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    1. Thank you, Mrs. P. I just took a bunch more, and blogged again :-)

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  15. Your harvests are amazing - as always. I hope to get a few potatoes this week. I just can not wait any longer!

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    1. I don't blame you, Christy. I am enjoying these potatoes more than anything else! I didn't grow them last year, and I'm so happy I found room for them this year.

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  16. Everything looks amazing as usual. I'm jealous of those sweetpeas! My biggest plants are only a foot high. Oh well, my 'Grandpa Ott' mg's have already reached the second story deck.

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    1. Ed, these sweet peas are supposed to grow 6' or higher, but they are struggling to reach 3' and I'm getting maybe 4-6 stems a day from them. It took two days to fill the small bud vase on my desk! I'll have to look for a better variety next year, but at least these are strong scented. "Grandpas" are just a few inches tall and waiting for some warm weather. It seems as though all we can get is about two or three days in a row.

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  17. Wow your potatoes are looking good! I started to dig some of ours this week but they are still pretty small. So I think I will give them a few more weeks before I get to busy digging them up! Great harvest this week!

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    1. Stoney Acres, I think it must have been the cooler and wetter than normal spring we had that made the potatoes grow so quickly. Just last week I was pulling out a lot of small ones, but this week they were all nice sized.

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  18. Your tomatoes look scrumptious! What variety are they and are they an early bloomer?

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    1. Gracie, they are Minigold that I started in the house last January, and grew in pots on the windowsill. The first tomatoes, the ones that ripened in the house, were quite good flavored. After I set the plants outside, the cool weather took a toll on flavor and made them a bit mealy. They should start tasting better when (if) it warms up, but we've had unusually cold temps.

      I've grown the variety before, out in the garden. The early flavor isn't great, but they bloom and bear early, and the flavor improved as the summer wore on. One small plant (they only get about 3' tall) outproduced my 12' tall indeterminate cherry tomato plants! And it was non-stop, still producing up until it froze.

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  19. Hi Annie, A wonderful, wonderful harvest! Hoping I will have some to pick when I get back home! Love the sweet peas too. Nancy

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    1. Nancy, the sweet peas are wonderful, I don't know of any flower that smells better!

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  20. I have put off growing potatoes for a while, but I am so growing them next time after seeing your taters. I had an uncle come over this weekend and look at my garden, and he was telling me how easy potatoes are. Your post just sealed the deal.

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    1. Kris, you must! Home grown, young, freshly dug potatoes are like fresh home grown corn....can't be beat for flavor!

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  21. You are in your garden groove now because that is a heck of a harvest week and I know you are just getting rolling. Those potatoes are just about as gorgeous as your perfect onions are. My potato patch is growing beautifully but is only just now starting to flower so it will be a little while yet before I can start stealing new potatoes - but hopefully not too much longer!

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    1. Kitsap, my Yukon Golds never blossom, and only about half of the Russet Norkota did. I didn't think the YG would be large enough, so I was pleasantly surprised that they seem to be in the 4-6 oz. range now. Six ounces is really a nice size for us.

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  22. You have such lovely harvests. I haven't started to harvest my carrots yet, but soon. I have to start the next batch in the ground too. Since I pulled half of the Asian greens bed I've got half to plant up. The only problem with that is they will be hard to water under the row cover. But with the carrot flies I have, I shouldn't complain about that too much.

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    1. Daphne, I was so under-planted with carrots for early spring I've since planted just about every square inch I can find! Not knowing if I'll have the nematode problem elsewhere in the garden, I've planted in several different areas. I had to go to the store and buy carrots for the stew this week! Horror of horrors!

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  23. Wow what a harvest, everything is beautiful! Envy those raspberries, they are probably my favorite and very hard to grow here in the desert.

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    1. Mary, we are really enjoying the raspberries, but they are way too few this year. My fault for pruning them too short. I'll not make that mistake again!

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