June 25, 2012 - Harvest Monday


 6/18 - The first cabbage, a dwarf variety that weighed nearly two pounds.  The last of the spring planting of shelling peas and the first crookneck squash of the season.


 6/18 - Minigold cherry tomatoes are being picked about three times a week now.  One of the plants was badly damaged in this week's wind, so it was pulled.  There are still two plants in the garden and one on the patio.  As soon as the main season tomatoes begin to bear, I'll probably eliminate two more of the Minigolds, as they give me too many tomatoes!  One plant of these is more than enough for the two of us.  We're getting plenty of raspberries for fresh eating now.  I doubt I'll be getting enough for jam, but I'm hoping.  Decent strawberry harvests are still about a month away.


 6/18 -   A big basket of (I think) Little Gem Romaine lettuce, all ready at once.  I was surprised to find two mature cucumbers on the Spacemaster vines.


 6/18 - Here it is all washed, with earwig damaged leaves removed.  This bunch (20.1 ounces) from the triangle garden,  had very little damage.  It was the sweetest, crispest lettuce!


 6/19 - Some of the small Walla Walla sweet onions that had flopped over were cleaned and refrigerated for immediate use.  The last of the snap peas were picked, and the vines removed to make room for a final planting of Fortex pole beans.  


 6/20 -   Raspberries, another croockneck squash, more Minigold tomatoes and a bouquet of sweet peas.  I'm loving the sweet peas, with their lovely scent, on my desk next to the computer.


 6/22 - The first head of broccoli, the last of the carrots from the nematode infested bed, zucchini and Russet Norkotah potatoes for baking.  Oh, my...they were good!  Most of the celery has bolted to seed, but I'm still getting enough for our salads and for cooking from the plants that remain.


 6/23 - Nine more heads of Little Gem Romaine and one of Iceberg lettuce, after the earwig damaged leaves were removed.  We got the hearts of the lettuce, the earwigs got the rest.


 6/23 - This is what the earwigs ruined from those ten heads of lettuce, a 2-gallon bucket full.  The compost bin got more than we did.


 6/23 - A good sized harvest of broccoli, 1.7 pounds for the freezer.


 6/23 - Raspberries for breakfast, a mouthful of strawberries that weren't even weighed.


 6/24 - I was stealing potatoes from under the plants, can't you tell?


6/24 -  More than 7-3/4 pounds of Yukon Gold and Dark Red Norlands were in that bucket.  I only planted four pounds of seed potatoes, and I've already harvested more than 25 pounds by just feeling around under the plants.  I was hoping for 10 pounds per seed potato, but I'll certainly exceed that amount....by quite a lot, I think!  The largest Red Norland weighed 6.8 ounces, and the largest Yukon Gold weighed 7.2 ounces.


 6/24 - Leaf lettuce, zucchini and two of the cured onions from the garage.


6/24 - And more Minigold tomatoes.  That's more than a pound of them this week, and they're not even producing in high gear yet!


Harvest for the week of 6/18 through 6/24 (in ounces) 


Broccoli - 34.9
Cabbage - 27.9
Carrots - 17.5
Celery - 4.6
Cucumbers - 8.7
Herbs 1.3
Lettuce - 58.4
Onions - 35.7
Peas, shelling - 4.5 (shelled weight)
Peas, snap - 6.8
Potatoes - 173.7 (10.86 pounds!)
Raspberries - 25.3
Squash, summer - 44.7
Strawberries - 1.2
Tomatoes - 18.2



Total for week: 463.4 oz (28.96 lb.) 
Total for year: 1465.6 oz (91.6 lb.)



Daphne's Dandelions is the host for Harvest Monday, where everyone can share links to their harvest for the week. Please visit her blog and leave a link, so we can enjoy your harvest photos! 

57 comments:

  1. Wow, all of that harvest! Very nice! The raspberries and tomatoes make my mouth water. We rarely get a raspberry as the birds beat us to them. Our strawberries are finished except for the alpines and the slugs had feasted away on them anyway. Ah, well. It amazes me to see the differences in harvest times from different parts of the country.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nutmeg, birds never bother my raspberries (knock on wood), but they sure do eat up my young lettuce and pea vines. My strawberries are everbearing, so the first few are never worth picking. Nice ones start next month!

      Delete
  2. Gorgeous harvest! Tomatoes, potatoes, raspberries, onions - YUMMY!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Another great haul! I don't know how you can say mine is ahead of yours! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. David, your peppers! Way ahead. I also meant to ask what variety of broccoli you planted, as it's way bigger than what I harvested.

      Delete
  4. Your new garden is producing great! I'm glad that you are getting a great harvest of 'Minigold' tomatoes. I'm getting a different harvest from my peas now- seeds!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ed, what kind of pea seeds are you saving? I bought some cheap Burpee pea seeds that I'm going to experiment with as a fall crop, but I'm saving that super sweet variety for spring.

      Delete
  5. Good grief, I haven't even harvested 28 lbs. all year yet. :P You are amazing! I just can't believe how much food your garden produces.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anywhere, I'm just getting started. You wait until I start harvesting winter squash....I only put four hills of them out there, and in 2010 I got over 79 pounds from two hills! I may have overplanted :-O

      Delete
  6. wow you got quite the harvest this week!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mrs. P., the refrigerator is full! I'm sending onions home with son John today, I have more than enough.

      Delete
  7. Beautiful harvests. And I want those cucumbers. They look so good. I keep rooting for mine to grow faster and they have been since the heat wave. Every day there is noticeable growth.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Daphne, I just went out to tie mine up and happened to look under some of the lower leaves. I thought it was the edge of the pot, but it just didn't look right. Upon further examination, I found a giant cucumber, wedged under the tomato cage that's holding them up. It weighed 15.9 ounces! I hope it's not too far gone :-(

      Delete
  8. Your harvests are really cranking out now! You must be in heaven.
    I still need to plant summer bearing raspberries---mine start bearing in fall---JUST in time for the first frost. Sigh.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sue, you should have been here for dinner tonight...the first picking of baby french filet green beans! Oh, my, they were awfully good. You need to get yourself home to your garden!

      Delete
  9. Looking good! I was just out "stealing" potatoes, too :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Deb, we ate "stolen" potatoes for dinner again tonight. Heck, I had a baked Yukon Gold for my lunch yesterday! I don't think I would ever get tired of freshly dug potatoes.

      Delete
  10. Great harvest and such a big variety. We are still about a month away from matching what you are producing. Our tomatoes are just starting to flower so we will be even longer with them. If all this heat doesn't kill the blossoms first!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Stoney Acres, last year I picked my first ripe tomato on June 21, a Bloody Butcher. This year I have nothing close to ripening yet (not counting the Minigolds that were grown inside for nearly four months). Your problem is the heat, my problem is the lack of heat!

      Delete
  11. Hi Annie, You have a nice variety of harvest for things to eat! When I can garden and cook as well as you I will feel as if I have arrived! You do wonderful. Nancy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nancy, you have a wonderful gardener to help you out, and I'm sure you are an excellent cook!

      Delete
  12. As always, I love your blog.
    Lisa

    ReplyDelete
  13. Such a beautiful and diverse harvest from your garden. Earwigs are a big problem in my garden this year as well. The lettuce was infested with them. A lot of outer leaves ended up in the compost bin here as well. Now they are in the celery. Ugh!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rachel, I think earwigs destroy more in my garden than any other insect/worm. The lettuce was just full of baby ones, so I'm sure it will get worse.

      Delete
  14. Impossibly lovely and abundant! Looks terrific.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Wow! Your harvest are such an inspiration! On the west side of the Cascades our raspberries & strawberries are in full swing. One month earlier than last year. Your potatoes look so yummy. There is nothing better than home grown potatoes. Cheers, Jenni

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jenni, I am sooooo hungry for strawberries! Luckily the raspberries are producing just enough to keep us in shortcake ;-)

      Delete
  16. What a terrific harvest week you've had, those are great looking potatoes! I"m hoping my big planting will do so good

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mary, it's been an exceptional year for potatoes so far! I couldn't be any happier with them in both yield and flavor.

      Delete
  17. This is a really yummy harvest week for you... hearts of baby romaines (yum!), mini gold tomatoes (Yum Yum!) Cucmbers and Fresh Potatoes (triple Yum!) and RASPBERRIES!!! (Yum to the Fourth Power!) Love harvests and your tally total is really starting to add up now.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kitsap, it got even better this evening...I picked the first green beans for our dinner! Then I got talked into making biscuit type shortcakes for those raspberries, and I had to eat some, of course. Fresh green beans and raspberry shortcake, all on the same day :-D

      Delete
  18. so many yummy items to choose from for Thursday! Maybe if you have too many tomatoes, you can donate them to a women's shelter or a low income housing bldg or food bank.

    Your ilttle romaine looks yummy and cute.

    I found a baby carrot split by the nematodes (I think). It had two legs. Does that mean them for sure? So sad if so since that's in the raised bed. Your big giant broccoli is impressive!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Amy T., too many yellow cherry tomatoes means a little bowl full, maybe 20 tiny tomatoes at most! I doubt they'd go far at a food bank. When I have lot of extra tomatoes they go to our local low income housing complex.

      I wouldn't worry about nematodes based on one two-legged carrot. That can happen for many reasons, from amount of water they are receiving to a rock in the soil.

      Delete
  19. Hi I am new to your blog, so far I love it!!!

    ReplyDelete
  20. I want to dig around and pull some of my potatoes but I am trying really hard to wait! I need to use up the last of the potatoes I bought at the store before I try one from the garden. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Christy I have a 10 pound bag of store bought potatoes that I'm going to donate to someone. The are so not as good as the ones from the garden!

      Delete
  21. hey! i've got a little something funny for you over at my place.. come on by!
    http://adventuresinthegoodland.blogspot.com/2012/06/nicholas-weighs-in-hard-day-7.html

    and superDUPER harvest! wish i had some zucch's - they are coming on but i sure would love from fried for dinner
    :-D

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ohiofarmgirl, Annie says "Arf-arf" and wants to know if Nicholas would like a pin-up of her big, beautiful self ;-)

      I actually had enough zucchs this week for two loaves of bread and an extra one for frying.

      Delete
  22. Wow! You've been busy! Looks like you've had a great week!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thiscrazygarden, the bad thing about a good week is the expectation of having a better "next week"! Sometimes it doesn't happen.

      Delete
  23. Annie, I don't know if you remember me...it's been awhile since I have blogged on The Beer Garden...things have been so busy for us but tonight I thought of you and EG for some random reason and had to say hi...your blog is fantastic as usual..
    : ) Take care

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sunny, I certainly do remember you! I've often wondered about you and The Beer Garden, too! I suppose the barbecue season is approaching fast for your husband.

      Delete
  24. Awesome harvest Gran! The potatoes look amazing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Thomas, we certainly are enjoying those potatoes....and I have the too tight jeans to prove it :-)

      Delete
    2. HAH. Potatoes are a great starch. Filling but not a huge amount of calories per say. I'm not finding a bunch of spuds near the surface. I think it may be because they needed to be watered much more than I have done. Or the heavier soil. It's probably a learning curve somewhere around here. :)

      Delete
    3. Cloud, I've found so many close to the surface that I'm afraid I won't find any when I begin digging!

      Potatoes are very good for us, especially with the skins. It's the butter that's killing me, LOL!

      Delete
    4. Solace in a 'happy' death though. Butter is delightful.

      Delete
  25. Granny, you rock! I really wish we could get our raspberries to produce as well as you. I know it's all about the way they are trimmed. I've read your post about them and books too. It's discouraging. They're only 2 years old now. Maybe they'll do better next year.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jody, the kind I have grow on second year canes. The ones that will bear fruit next year are just now growing and getting quite tall. As soon as this year's crop stops bearing, probably mid July, I'll cut those old canes completely down to the ground (new canes are green, old canes are brown and woody). I pruned my new canes too short last fall, so I'm not getting nearly as many berries as I should. It's a learning experience for me, too. These are the first summer bearing plants I've ever grown, at my other house I grew everbearing.

      Delete
  26. I am from outside Seattle, Wa. it is not warm enough the last several yrs. for us to have a garden. We have a green house and we went to raised beds. When we did not have raised beds we still were not getting the produce. What a lovely garden and home you have. My mother was born in Horse Haven, Wa. Thanks

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous, I've been lucky to always live where I could grow a garden. If I were in a short season area, I'd have a greenhouse too! Actually, I'd like to have one here, but there just isn't room for one without giving up a lot of valuable garden space.

      Delete
  27. How many potato plants would take to yield roughly 40lbs of potatoes???

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Daniel, I figure about ten pounds to one pound of seed potatoes. I got about 54 plants from 4 pounds of seed, so figure it out from there! I was hoping to get 40 pounds, but I think I'll get quite a bit more than that.

      Delete