July 3, 2012 - Silver Queen Down!

 Corn's down!


Hilled and tromped, corn's up....kinda.


Down again.  I give up.  Maybe the wind won't be blowing tomorrow.


36 comments:

  1. Oh no! Your poor corn. I hope it makes it. The corn out in our fields is shriveling from lack of rain. Either way, it's tough to see it go down.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The wind finally stopped, and not expecting any tomorrow. I'll try to get it hilled up again in the morning. The roots aren't exposed, so it should be OK. I might have to tie it up to something though.

      Delete
  2. Hi Annie, I am so sorry about your corn. Hoping you get less windy weather. Nancy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nancy, the wind did its damage, then it stopped as quickly as it started.

      Delete
  3. It looks great when it's upright and laying down. It's green and healthy, let's just hope for less wind. :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 1st. Man, the wind here is my nemesis! Just nothing I can do about it, except hope it doesn't do too much damage.

      Delete
  4. Replies
    1. Cloud, I think it's salvageable. At least the older corn plants mostly withstood the force of the wind.

      Delete
    2. The other day I accidently pushed one of the cherokee eagles over with the watering but Its since recovered after I mounded a bunch of dirt around its base. Strange how they choose to grow. You place the seed deep enough so you would assume it would have a nice secure root. Instead it tries to grow roots above the surface in much the same manner as a 50 year old Maple!

      Delete
    3. BTW, your rabbits do not attempt eating the corn plants in your woods?

      Delete
    4. Cloud, there aren't any rabbits around here. We had a 10-year-old pet rabbit that a feral cat killed last October, and now we just have Annie and Otto, who actually will eat just about anything. Fortunately, a dachshund's 3-inch long legs don't allow them to reach high enough to eat the corn ;-)

      Delete
    5. BTW, Cloud, did you get the PDFs I sent you last night? If so, were you able to open them?

      Delete
  5. Oh, no! That Silver Queen is too good for this to happen. I bought a dozen (got 13) ears at the Farmer's Market Saturday and we cooked them on the grill last night. Food of the gods! Hope that wind dies down.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dianefaith, I just have that one small square of the Silver Queen. My Honey Select is still standing.

      Delete
  6. Our asparagus is going horizontal. Maybe for tall crops, they have to be sort of caged to start, on a grid or something. Sigh. You don't want to be fighting that corn all the time, do you? How do big farmers deal?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Stefaneener, the taller corn took the wind storm pretty well, I noticed a couple of them leaning, but not like the small plot. I'll do some more hilling up in the morning, maybe tie them together with a long rope, LOL! They grow lots of corn around here, I think it bounces back pretty well. I had just watered when the wind came up so strong, so the ground was really soft.

      Delete
  7. We have terrible wind here also. My sunflowers tried to fall over early in the spring so I took the green stakes that you pound into the ground and pounded some in at the corners of the area. I strung rope around the edges to hold up the sunflowers and it worked. Next year I am going to use the stakes and put them on the edges every six inches to a foot and string rope across the growing area so that the flowers and corn can grow up in between the ropes so they have support in the wind.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Peggi, last year I pounded large staples into the fence and ran cotton clothesline through them and around the sunflowers to keep them from blowing over. At least the fence didn't blow down! I think I'm going to have to devise some type of fence or rope around that corn to hold it upright.

      Delete
  8. Oh man, I hope your corn survives that wind! It looks so healthy too. Always something with the weather! I've been thinking how before gardening, I didn't really care what the weather was doing. Now I think about it all the time, lol!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nutmeg, I've always gardened, so I've always fussed when the wind blows too hard, it's too hot, it freezes, it rains too much, it's too dry. Always something!

      Delete
  9. Oh how sad. I hope my corn stays upright when I'm gone.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Daphne, I'm quite certain it's salvageable.

      Delete
  10. Those should right themselves, but you could use those small green bamboo poles and anchor the stalks to those. For a plot your size it is a quick and super easy fix that will work well.

    Here is a post from my blog last year where I did this, also on silver queen.
    http://georgiahomegarden.blogspot.com/2011/09/how-to-fix-and-support-blown-over-corn.html

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kris, I think they'll right themselves. I might have to go stomp a bit more on their roots today.

      Delete
  11. Even being wind-blown they still look pretty healthy! Hopefully their roots will get stronger before your next big breeze blows through. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dewdrop, thank you for following my blog! I can always count on a few hard wind storms every growing season. I'm pretty used to them, but that doesn't mean I like it!

      Delete
  12. AH! I hate when that happens. Looks like they may need a prop to hold 'em up. Hope the roots weren't damaged.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Loretta, so far they're still green and not showing any wilt.

      Delete
  13. Maybe if you lasso the whole bunch and tie them up to a post? At least that would prevent more damage from being on the ground. That's what I had to do with my peas because they refused to use the perfectly good trellis I made them. ;)

    ReplyDelete
  14. oh no!! What's up with all the wind this year. We are getting blown away here too...yet again. Corn is pretty strong so I hope yours bounces back :)

    ReplyDelete
  15. Hope your corn will recover from the wind and you'll have good harvest

    ReplyDelete
  16. The post was sorta funny to me despite the hassle you had. Just a three liner...it's down, it's up, it's down...good like a short joke.
    So, I was thinking about the ideas above and thought about how florists use tape criss crossing the top of a vase. If you can put stakes around the outside, then tie (whatever twiney thing you have) at about 3 feet or higher, it'll be like a grid to catch them in. I'd have to draw it out but maybe you get the idea.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Here's hoping they stay upright now that the wind has died down. My artichokes are laying down on the job. I think I will construct a simple fence support around them next year to keep them vertical as well.

    ReplyDelete
  18. I hope it's all right, doesn't look like you had to worry about the pollen being blown away just yet so that's a bonus!

    ReplyDelete
  19. Hope it straightens out! Staking it an option?

    ReplyDelete
  20. To all who were concerned, the corn stalks righted themselves so now they are almost straight again. Two of them might need a bit of help, the rest look just fine.

    ReplyDelete